19/11/20—19/11/20

Death of the lecture – A ‘lecture-performance’ on the subject of a ‘lecture-performance’

The Virtual Lectures by Frank Wasser

Register here for free tickets.
Streamed live 4–5pm, Thursday, 19th November 2020

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‘I am here. And there is nothing to say.’ The opening lines of John Cage’s ‘Lecture on Nothing’ written in 1959 and included in his 1961 collection of texts Silence mark the questioning of knowledge production pertinent in the avant-garde art practices of the early 1960’s. ‘Lecture on Nothing’ can be considered as a starting point in considering the history for the lecture-performance.

In 1964, the American artist Robert Morris presented his performance 21.3. The lecture-performance, which was presented in the context of the Judson Dance Theatre circle, was in the form of a traditional lecture in which the artist lip-synched and gesture-synched to a recording of a methodological lecture by the art historian Erwin Panofsky from 1939. Lecturing is drag. Morris used the reflexive format of the lecture, arguably for the first time as an artistic medium, to question the established conceptions of the ‘lecture’. The catalyst for this work came from the artist’s ongoing resistance to an art history bound only by categorisations based on period and style or cultural preservation. Assimilation framed as performance is a key characteristic of the early examples of the lecture-performance and can also be noted in the works of Yvonne Rainer, Chris Burden and later in the works of Andrea Fraser and Mark Leckey. 

The ‘lecture-performance’ incorporates elements of both the academic lecture and of performance in contemporary and modern art history. This slippery categorisation often functions simultaneously as a meta-lecture and as meta-performance, and as such challenges established ideas about the production of knowledge and meaning within the formal components to which they refer, that is educational institutions, cultural institutions and the academic norms of lecturing (Ladnar, 2014).

Join the lecturer/performer as he investigates through an anthology of examples, the history of these forms and asks why artists have turned and continue to turn towards this format while testing the limits of such categorisations.

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Frank Wasser is an artist, writer and art historian from the Liberties, Dublin who lives and works in London. He works across an array of materials and mediums that often concern writing and performance (on and off-page) and educational pedagogies. He has exhibited and lectured internationally. Recent Projects include: ‘The Slow abrogation of the…’ A solo performance at Jerwood Arts, London, Survey, a group show, BALTIC centre for contemporary arts, Newcastle, G39, Cardiff and The Bluecoat, Liverpool, THE LIVING NEWSPAPER (with Elaine Reynolds and Chris Timms), Tate Modern, London.

Wasser will publish his first book ‘Slip’ with the imprint MA Bibliotheque in April 2021. He is currently a Dphil candidate at Ruskin School of Art, University of Oxford and he lectures regularly at Tate Modern and Tate Britain. In 2018 Wasser was the recipient of an Arts Council of Ireland Visual Arts Bursary.

For individual lectures, please contact frank@thevirtuallectures.com
or visit  The Virtual Lectures

Pallas Projects/Studios is funded by The Arts Council


09/11/20—16/11/20

IADT/Pallas Projects Mentorship Award—Lana May Fleming

IADT and Pallas Projects are delighted to announce recent IADT graduate Lana May Fleming as the winner of the newly established IADT/Pallas Projects Mentorship Award. This Mentorship Award recognises skills in exhibition administration, communications, organisation, project management and teamwork. It is awarded each year to the IADT BA (Hons) Art student who has made the most significant contribution to the coordination and organisation of IADT’s 'In the making' exhibition series at Pallas Projects.

Lana will be the recipient of a stipend and three mentoring sessions with a curator from Pallas Projects, to be completed during the six months following her Graduation.

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Lana May Fleming is a visual artist with a focus on installation, video, sculptural and performative practices. Lana is a recent graduate of Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology’s BA Art programme where she achieved a first class honours degree. In her work, scenarios are created drawing a blurred line of familiarity in re-imaginations of the mundane and fantastical. To eat is to feel satisfied, to hunger is to seek satisfaction. This starving of desires often culminates in the personification of food. Her work animates symbolic chimaera’s of food products and productised women. Bodily forms transgress from clay to screen; as both the objects and the body are performed their separation becomes blurred, mirrored in food grooming and beauty grooming alike, we are grown to be appealing.

Currently Lana is a co-curator of cruxx.project a platform created by graduates of IADT which will host both physical and digital airings of work otherwise unseen due to Covid-19.


29/10/20—29/10/20

On the impossible histories of Art(ist) and Activism: A lecture/list

 

Register here for free tickets.

Streamed live 4–5pm, Thursday, 29th October 2020

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The Virtual Lectures by Frank Wasser — trace the ways that art has been conceived as a form of political activism since early 20th century

Now, the urgency and need to address what it might mean to organise and how to organise, to ‘demand the impossible’ [1]  is necessary, if not vital. All is at stake.

An anthology of examples, subjects, themes, tangents, distractions that may be addressed include but are not limited to:

Manifestos pinned to frosty telephone poles,
Dada,
David Hammons melting snowballs,
Protest,
Responsibility (and a thereof lack of),
The co-opting of artistic practices by art institutions,
Agency,
Guerrilla Girls,
Judith Butler,
Joseph Beuys,
Patrick Ireland,
Nan Goldin,
Death,
Living Newspapers,
Tania Burgera,
Adam Pendleton,
Forensic Architecture,
Activism and Social Media,
The current direct action campaigns that are holding art institutions globally accountable for their decisions and demanding the impossible.

This virtual lecture will trace the ways that art has been conceived as a form of political activism since the early 20th century through to today. The lecture will take the form of a seemingly sporadic yet intricately linked list. The political histories, legacies, influences, successes, failures, and implications of artistic practices that have been positioned as forms of activism will be the focus of this list which can be used as resource for further conversations and direct action.

[1]  ‘Be realistic: Demand the impossible’ a May 1968 quote referenced by the artist Tai Shani in a recently published opinion piece on the contemporary art world informs the title of this lecture.  Specifically, the opinion piece outlines concerns with the ‘art worlds’ move towards the right https://artreview.com/why-art-workers-must-demand-the-impossible/

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Frank Wasser is an artist, writer and art historian from the Liberties, Dublin who lives and works in London. He works across an array of materials and mediums that often concern writing and performance (on and off-page) and educational pedagogies. He has exhibited and lectured internationally. Recent Projects include: ‘The Slow abrogation of the…’ A solo performance at Jerwood Arts, London, Survey, a group show, BALTIC centre for contemporary arts, Newcastle, G39, Cardiff and The Bluecoat, Liverpool, THE LIVING NEWSPAPER (with Elaine Reynolds and Chris Timms), Tate Modern, London.

Wasser will publish his first book ‘Slip’ with the imprint MA Bibliotheque in April 2021. He is currently a Dphil candidate at Ruskin School of Art, University of Oxford and he lectures regularly at Tate Modern and Tate Britain. In 2018 Wasser was the recipient of an Arts Council of Ireland Visual Arts Bursary.

For individual lectures, please contact frank@thevirtuallectures.com
or visit  The Virtual Lecture

Pallas Projects/Studios is funded by The Arts Council


  • Image courtesy of the artist.

22/08/20—22/08/20

Workshop: Barry Mulholland—Manipulating New Materials

Saturday 22nd August

Workshop times: 1pm, 2pm, 4pm, 5pm

Each workshop will last approx 30-45min
6 people each group

Register on Eventbrite for tickets.

Please note: workshop will take place outdoors, participants will need to bring & wear masks, and it will involve using hot tools. 

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The workshop looks at how new materials can be manipulated and incorporated into art objects.

We will look at how materials, such as laser-cut acrylic plastics can be cut, shaped and assembled to create interesting shapes.

Playing around with the polymorphic and thermoplastic nature of plastics to come up with some interesting forms.

The aim is to open up fresh thinking about the use of non-traditional materials in art making. Also, to encourage experimentation and relationship with man-made materials.

Heat guns, wire strip heaters, hand saws and tools will be used. The participants are encouraged to contribute towards a final wall installation.

This workshop offers an insight into materials and processes used in the creation of Tossed in The Drink, by Barry Mulholland. Currently on show at Pallas Projects

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Barry Mulholland is a Belfast based Visual Artist and member of Flax Art Studios. A postgraduate MA in Visual Arts Practices at IADT and BA in Fine & Applied Art at Ulster University. Previously a co-director at Platform Arts, Belfast. Recent solo shows include Bogeymen, exhibited as part of TACTICAL MAGIC curated by Kerry Guinan at TULCA Festival of Visual Arts, Galway 2019. Awards include, recipient of the Taylor Art Award 2012 at the RDS Visual Arts Awards, Dublin. Barry is currently supported by the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and the Freeland Foundation, London.

barrymulhollandvisualartist.com

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Artist-Initiated Projects at Pallas Projects/Studios is an open-submission, annual gallery programme of 10 x 3-week exhibitions taking place at rescheduled dates from August 2020, in the context of a gallery space with a dedicated tradition towards the professional development of artists in a peer-led, supportive environment. This unique programme of funded, artist-initiated projects selected via open call is highly accessible to artists, with a focus on early career, emerging artists and recent graduates. Projects are supplemented with artists' talks, texts, workshops or performances, and gallery visits by colleges and local schools.

Artist-Initiated Projects aims to act as an incubator for early careers, and support artists' practices at crucial stages, providing a platform for artists to produce and exhibit challenging work across all art forms. The model of short-run exhibitions with a relatively short turnaround time of 3–6 months is an alternative to the normal institutional model, where the process of studio visit to exhibition can take several years. Shorter lead-in times allow the programme to be quick and responsive, reflect what artists are currently making, and encourage experimentation and risk-taking.

Pallas Projects/Studios Artist-Initiated Projects is funded by The Arts Council


15/07/20—15/07/20

Control, Alt, Delete —A lecture on the history and politics of Internet Art

Thursday 23rd July, 4-5pm

Register on Eventbrite for tickets.

Pallas Projects are please to present Control, Alt, Delete —A lecture on the history and politics of Internet Art by artist Frank Wasser as part of their online programme for 2020. 

The Covid-19 pandemic has brought about a proliferation of online viewing rooms/exhibitions (curated web pages of images and video), ‘live’ streamed events/performance, talks, lectures and an approach to art and exhibition making which contestably could easily and unknowingly fall into the categorisation of what might be considered as, Internet Art(1). This art and exhibition-making has been disseminated through an Internet which today has become reliant on structures and systems of surveillance, sustained by profit driven platforms with unethical, increasingly authoritarian and questionable politics(2).

In an attempt to prompt a discourse around the technologies and platforms used in contemporary approaches to art and exhibition making online, this lecture will piece together a brief history of Internet Art and trace the multiple transnational histories of a technology that was once regarded for its emancipatory potential. The lecture will outline the origins of Internet Art in the 1990s outlining works by the duo Joan Hermskerk and Dirk Paesmans, Olia Lialina, Hito Steyerl, to the Post-Internet(3), considering works that are derived in and from the Internet or its effects on aesthetics, culture and politics. Through a variety of examples drawn from contemporary art, mass media and popular culture, Wasser will suggest how those effects have become co-opted and used against the one time promise of a networked world. The lecture will also aim to generate a discourse that will necessarily complicate and dismantle the binary of URL/IRL* that persists in this present moment.
(1) Internet Art emerged in the 1990s when artists found that the internet was becoming a useful tool to produce their art uninhibited by political, social or cultural constraints. ​
(2) ‘Zoom is malware’: why experts worry about the video conferencing platform https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/apr/02/zoom-technology-security-coronavirus-video-conferencing
(3) The term emerged from mid-2000s discussions about Internet Art by Marisa Olson, Gene McHugh, and Artie Vierkant
*Online space/In real life


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Frank Wasser is an artist, writer and art historian from the Liberties, Dublin who lives and works in London. He works across an array of materials and mediums that often concern writing and performance (on and off-page) and educational pedagogies. He has exhibited and lectured internationally. Recent Projects include: ‘The Slow abrogation of the…’ A solo performance at Jerwood Arts, London, Survey, a group show, BALTIC centre for contemporary arts, Newcastle, G39, Cardiff and The Bluecoat, Liverpool, THE LIVING NEWSPAPER (with Elaine Reynolds and Chris Timms), Tate Modern, London.

Wasser will publish his first book ‘Slip’ with the imprint MA Bibliotheque in December 2020. He is currently a Dphil candidate at Ruskin School of Art, University of Oxford and he lectures regularly at Tate Modern and Tate Britain. In 2018 Wasser was the recipient of an Arts Council of Ireland Visual Arts Bursary.


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